Learners deploy, or apply, their knowledge and aptitudes in a way that creates value for themselves and for others in society, and in doing so they help society improve.

There is a growing number of social-change entrepreneurs who share the principles and perspective that animate our vision. The findings, published in the Journal of Adolescent Research in December of 2018, come from a series of focus groups that researchers conducted with recently graduated and ethnically diverse students who were born between 1990 and 1997, and enrolled in one of two U.S. universities. Importantly, not all cliques are negative or socialize children to act aggressively. Still, cliques are likely just a result of human nature — the desire to sort ourselves into groups for reasons of familiarity and certainty, control and dominance, and security and support, as Mark Prigg wrote. The researchers also classified these crowds into two groups: conventional and counterculture, with "conventional crowds embracing the values typically rewarded by the U.S. educational system and counterculture crowds opposing and/or providing alternatives to them.". Consider these facts: